Immigrate to Australia

 

Australia, the world’s smallest continent as well as the world’s largest island, the name is derived from the Latin AUSTRALIS, means southern, legends of an “unknown land of the south.

 

Australia is often referred to as the “lucky country” with pulsating economy, political stability and a quality of life envied by many. Australia is known around the world for its stunning landscapes. 

A great country to live in and do business, Australia has an enviable reputation as it offers premium standard of living. The aspirants can immigrate to Australia under the following programs:

 

Flags


When the Australian colonies federated to form the Commonwealth of Australia on 1 January 1901, the British flag had been the official flag for more than 100 years. The birth of a new nation created the opportunity to develop an emblem that represented Australia alone. An official competition for a design attracted 32 823 entries. Five of these, which contained almost identical designs, were placed equal first. Apart from later changes in the sizes of the stars and the number of points, these joint winners had produced the present Australian flag.

The Australian national flag symbolizes Australia’s historical links with Britain (represented on the flag by the British flag, known most commonly by the nickname Union Jack) and Australia’s location in the southern hemisphere (represented on the flag by stars of the Southern Cross). The larger seven-pointed star represents the six original states and the territories of the Commonwealth.

Other official flags of Australia include the Australian Aboriginal flag, the Torres Strait Islander flag and the respective flags of the states and territories.

 

Floral emblem

The golden wattle was proclaimed the official national floral emblem in August 1988. It is a spreading shrub or small tree, which grows in the under storey of open forest, woodland and open scrub in South Australia, Victoria, New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory.

Since 1912, on the recommendation of the Prime Minister, Andrew Fisher, wattle has been included as the decoration surrounding the Commonwealth coat of arms and it has also been used in the design of Australian stamps and many awards in the Australian honors system.

 

Coat of arms

The present Australian coat of arms was granted by King George V in 1912. It consists of a shield containing the badges of the six Australian states, enclosed by an ermine border. The shield is a symbol for the federation of the states, which took place in 1901.

The crest, which is the device above the shield and helmet, is a seven-pointed gold star on a blue and gold wreath. Six of the points represent each of the states of the Commonwealth; the seventh point represents the Australia’s territories.

The supporters of the shield are native Australian animals: the red kangaroo (Macropus Rufus) and the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae). Usually the coat of arms is depicted on a background of sprays of golden wattle (Acacia pycnantha) with a scroll beneath it containing the word ‘Australia’. The wattle and scroll, however, are not part of the armorial design and are not mentioned in the Royal Warrant of 1912.

A Royal Warrant of King Edward VII granted the first official coat of arms of Australia in 1908. This coat of arms was used on some Australian coins even after it was superseded in 1912, and last appeared on the sixpenny piece in 1966.

The Australian Government uses the coat of arms to authenticate documents and for other official purposes. Its uses range from embellishing the Australian passport to forming part of all Australian government departmental insignias. (See also the fact sheet on Australia’s coat of arms.)

Australia has never adopted any official faunal or bird emblem, but, by popular tradition, the kangaroo and emu are widely accepted as such.

Australia has no official motto. For many years, the motto ‘Advance Australia’ appeared on unofficial coats of arms, even before the federation of the states in 1901. It was included in the 1908 arms, and was popularly accepted in association with the 19th century song ‘Advance Australia Fair’. A revised version of this song became Australia’s official national anthem in 1984.

 

National colours


The Governor-General proclaimed Green and gold Australia’s national colours on 19 April 1984. Before the proclamation Australia had no official colures, although three colors combinations traditionally had a claim to be Australia’s national colures: red, white and blue; blue and gold; and green and gold.

The colures red, white and blue were featured in the first coat of arms of the Commonwealth in 1908 and are the colures of the Australian national flag.

The colures blue and gold have heraldic significance, as they are the colures of the crest of the present Commonwealth coat of arms.

The colors green and gold were popularly used as the national colures even before the official proclamation. They have been used in Australian and international sporting events since the nineteenth century and have been associated with many great sporting achievements since.

 

Culture of Australia


Australia Society and Culture Australia’s has diverse culture and lifestyle. Australia’s original inhabitants, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, are the custodians of one of the world’s oldest continuing cultural traditions.

Rest of Australia’s people are migrants or descendants of migrants who have arrived in Australia from different countries since Great Britain established the first European settlement at Sydney Cove in 1788. Australia has a population of around 23 million people. 25.6 per cent of the estimated resident population comprised those born overseas.

Within the framework of Australia’s laws, all Australians have the right to express their culture and beliefs and to participate freely in Australia’s national life. Everyone is expected to uphold the principles and shared values that support Australia’s way of life. These include:

  • Respect for equal worth, dignity and freedom of the individual

  • Freedom of speech and association

  • Freedom of religion and a secular government

  • Support for parliamentary democracy and the rule of law

  • Equality under the law

  • Equality of men and women

  • Equality of opportunity

  • Peacefulness

  • A spirit of egalitarianism that embraces tolerance, mutual respect, and compassion for those in need.

Australia also holds firmly to the belief that no one should be disadvantaged on the basis of their country of birth, cultural heritage, language, gender or religious belief. The unemployment rate is relatively low (in December 2007 it was 4.3 per cent) and the gross per capita income is around $39 000. All people are equal under the law in Australia and all Australians have the right to be respected and treated in a fair manner.

Language 

All people in Australia are encouraged to learn English, which are the national language and an important unifying element of Australian society. However, languages other than English are also valued.

 

Religious worship

Australia is a predominantly Christian country, with around 64 per cent of all Australians identifying as Christians. However, most other major religious faiths are also practiced, reflecting Australia’s culturally diverse society.

Indigenous Australians have their own unique religious traditions and spiritual values. Australia has no official state religion and people are free to practice any religion they choose, as long as they obey the law. Australians are also free not to have a religion.

Vibrant arts scene

Australia has a vibrant arts scene that reflects both the nation’s Indigenous cultural traditions and its rich mosaic of migrant cultures. All forms of the visual and performing arts have strong followings, including film, art, theatre, dance and music.

 

A sporting culture

Australians love their sport, both playing it and watching it. Australia is also ranked the top cricketing nation in the world. Australia has often achieved impressive results at the elite level Sports Tournaments.

Australia has one of the most diverse cuisines in the world, thanks to Asian and European migrant influences. Australia has no national Cosine.

Australia, one of the world’s most efficient agricultural nations, produces high–quality vegetables, fruit and grains, meat, poultry, seafood, and cheeses and other dairy products.

The Australian wine sector is recognized internationally as producing a full range of high-quality wine styles and varietals to match any dish, from full-bodied reds and deep fruity whites to sparkling, dessert and fortified wines. Obeying the law.

 

 

 

Clothing

The types of clothing that people wear reflect the diversity in Australian society and the variations in climate. There are no laws or rules on clothing, but Australians are expected to wear certain clothing in work situations — most workplaces have dress standards.

 

An Egalitarian Society

In most practical ways, Australia is an egalitarian society. This does not mean that everyone is the same or that everybody has equal wealth or property.

But it does mean that there are no formal or entrenched class distinctions in Australian society, as there are in some other countries. It also means that with hard work and commitment, people without high-level connections or influential patrons can realize their ambitions.

The unemployment rate is relatively low (in December 2007 it was 4.3 per cent) and the gross per capita income is around $39 000. All people are equal under the law in Australia and all Australians have the right to be respected and treated in a fair manner.

 

A Typical Australian

Given the diverse nature of today’s Australia, some people question whether there is a ‘typical’ Australian. There is, of course, no shortage of popular stereotypes, some of which contradict each other.

For example, some people see Australians as egalitarian, irreverent people with a deep suspicion of authority while others regard them as mostly law-abiding and even conformist. Some people, particularly those living overseas, believe Australians live mainly in country areas, the Australian outback or the bush. In fact, more than 75 per cent of Australians live a cosmopolitan lifestyle in urban centers, mainly in the capital cities along the coast. Others see Australians as people who live in a ‘lucky country’ who love their leisure, particularly sport, both as spectators and as participants. In fact, Australians are among the hardest-working people in the world with some of the longest working hours in the developed world.

Another common perception of Australians is that they are informal, open and direct and say what they mean. They are also seen as people who believe in the principle of giving people a fair go and standing up for their mates, the disadvantaged and the underdog.

Many of these popular images have some truth to them and most Australians conform to at least some of them. But Australians, like people everywhere, cannot be so easily stereotyped. There are ‘typical’ Australians everywhere. But they are not all the same.

 

Language


All people in Australia are encouraged to learn English, which are the national language and an important unifying element of Australian society.

However, languages other than English are also valued. In fact, more than 15 per cent of Australians speak languages other than English at home.

The most commonly spoken languages after English are Italian, Greek, Cantonese, Arabic, Vietnamese and Mandarin. Australians speak more than 200 languages, including Indigenous Australian languages.

 

Australian English

While English is Australia’s national language, there are certain words and expressions that have become regarded as uniquely Australian through common usage. Some of them might seem strange to non-Australians.

The use of these colloquial or slang words, often coupled with an Australian sense of humor that is characterized by irony and irreverence, can sometimes cause confusion for international visitors. There are a number of books on Australian colloquialisms and slang, including the Macquarie Book of Slang.

 

Religious worship

Australia is a predominantly Christian country, with around 64 per cent of all Australians identifying as Christians. However, most other major religious faiths are also practiced, reflecting Australia’s culturally diverse society.

Australia’s earliest religions or spiritual beliefs date back to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, who have inhabited Australia for between 40 000 and 60 000 years. Indigenous Australians have their own unique religious traditions and spiritual values.

Australia has no official state religion and people are free to practice any religion they choose, as long as they obey the law. Australians are also free not to have a religion.

 

The Courts


The High Court of Australia interprets and applies the law of Australia, decides cases of special federal significance, including challenges to the constitutional validity of laws, and hears appeals (by special leave) from the federal, state and territory courts. The High Court has a Chief Justice and six other judges who can preside either individually or together. It is the highest court of appeal on all matters, whether decided in the federal or state jurisdictions.

The other federal courts are the Federal Court of Australia, the Family Court of Australia and the Federal Magistrates Court of Australia. Under the Constitution, state and territory courts may be invested with federal jurisdiction.

The Federal Court’s jurisdiction is broad, covering almost all civil matters arising under Australian federal law and some summary criminal matters. The court also has substantial and diverse appellate jurisdiction, including over the decisions of single judges of the Federal Court and the Federal Magistrates Court (in non-family-law matters) and some decisions of the state and territory courts.

The Family Court is Australia’s superior court in family law. Through its specialist judges and staff, the court helps to resolve complex family disputes. It also covers specialized areas such as cases relating to The Hague Convention on International Child Abductions (which came into force in Australia in December 1998) and the international relocation of children by parents or guardians.

The Federal Magistrates Court was established by the federal parliament in 1999 and conducted its first sittings in July 2000. Its jurisdiction includes family law, bankruptcy, unlawful discrimination, consumer protection and trade practices, and privacy, migration, copyright and industrial law. Nearly its entire jurisdiction is shared with the Family Court or the Federal Court.

Australian state and territory courts have jurisdiction in all matters brought under state or territory laws. They also handle some matters arising under federal laws, where jurisdiction has been conferred by the federal parliament. State and territory courts deal with most criminal matters, whether arising under federal, state or territory law.

Each state and territory court system operates independently. All states have supreme courts and some also have courts of criminal appeal, which are the highest appellate courts at the state level. Courts known as ‘district’ or ‘county’ courts hear the more serious cases, with a judge presiding over the court to interpret and determine the law. For more serious charges it is usual for a jury (usually of 12 people) to determine the guilt or innocence of defendants. Serious offences such as murder, rape and armed robbery are usually tried in a higher court.

Lesser offences are dealt with in lower courts, known as local or magistrates courts (or courts of petty sessions), where magistrates determine the guilt or innocence of defendants.

In all cases, defendants are considered to be innocent until proven guilty beyond all reasonable doubt. There is no death penalty in Australia.

 

Legal Aid and Representation

Australian governments recognize that access to legal representation is an important element in ensuring justice for all. They provide some legal aid for people assessed as being least able to afford to cover the costs of a court appearance.

The federal Attorney General’s Department is responsible for administering funding for the provision of legal aid services for federal law matters through legal aid commissions, administering a Community Legal Services Program and managing legal aid services for Indigenous Australians.

State and territory governments fund legal aid services for cases being tried under state and territory law. There are eight independent legal aid commissions, one in each of the states and territories, with a total budget of around $400 million. The federal government and state and territory governments provide funding. Other revenue comes from interest earnings, contributions and fees.

 

Investigating complaints and reviewing administrative decisions

Specific agencies also exist to protect the legal and administrative rights of all people in Australia, including the Commonwealth Ombudsman, the Migration Review Tribunal, the Refugee Review Tribunal, the Administrative Appeals Tribunal and the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission.

The position of Commonwealth Ombudsman was created in 1977 to consider and investigate complaints from people who believe they have been treated unfairly or unreasonably by a federal government department or agency. The ombudsman cannot override decisions made by agencies or issue directions to agency staff. Instead, the ombudsman resolves disputes through consultation and negotiation and, if necessary, by making formal recommendations to the most senior levels of government.

There is also an ombudsman in Western Australia (appointed in 1971), Victoria (1972), Queensland (1974) and New South Wales (1974). The Commonwealth Ombudsman acts as the ombudsman for the Australian Capital Territory.

Two separate tribunals provide independent and final merits reviews of decisions made about visas to enter or stay in Australia. The Migration Review Tribunal reviews decisions made about general visas (including visitor, student, partner, family, business and skilled). The Refugee Review Tribunal deals with decisions regarding protection (refugee) visas.

 

Administrative Appeals Tribunal

The Administrative Appeals Tribunal began operations in July 1976 and is part of the federal Attorney General’s portfolio. It is an independent body that conducts merits reviews of a wide range of administrative decisions made by other tribunals and by federal government ministers, officials and authorities. The Administrative Appeals Tribunal has jurisdiction to review decisions made under more than 400 separate Acts and legislative instruments.

 

Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission

The Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission was established in 1986 as an independent statutory organization reporting to the federal parliament through the Attorney General. Its goals are to foster understanding about, and protection of, human rights in Australia and to address human rights concerns. Its functions include resolving complaints of discrimination or breaches of human rights under federal law and holding public inquiries into human rights issues of national importance.

 

Law enforcement and police

The police in Australia are responsible for keeping peace and order in the community and bringing before the court people they believe have broken the law. Although police officers may arrest people and give evidence in court, they do not decide whether or not people are guilty of crimes. This is the responsibility of the courts.

Australia has a national police force—the Australian Federal Police—that investigates offences against federal laws, including drug trafficking, illegal immigration, crimes against national security and crimes against the environment.

All states of Australia and the Northern Territory have their own police forces that deal with crimes under state or territory laws. Policing in the Australian Capital Territory is handled by the Australian Federal Police.

 

Australian Crime Commission

The Australian Crime Commission was established in January 2003 (replacing the National Crime Authority) as an independent statutory body to work nationally with federal, state and territory agencies, principally to counter serious and organized crime. It brings together all arms of Australian intelligence gathering and law enforcement to coordinate the fight against major crime.

 

International legal cooperation and treaties

Australia seeks to promote international cooperation in the legal sector. The federal government established the International Legal Services Advisory Council in 1990 to promote the globalization of legal services. The council seeks to promote understanding of different countries’ laws, legal systems and legal institutions, particularly in the areas of trade, business and international law. It also contributes to the development of legal institutions, education and training, and legal interchanges and contacts.

Combating transnational crime and terrorism is also a high priority for Australia, and extradition and mutual assistance are key tools in that fight. International cooperation ensures that criminals cannot evade justice simply by crossing borders. Australia has formal extradition arrangements with more than 120 countries.

Australia is a party to an extensive range of treaties, which are the formal instruments of international law. Australia is currently a signatory to agreements on a wide and expanding range of matters, including with respect to postal, shipping, social security and health arrangements, defense and security, nuclear non-proliferation, the environment, civil aviation, maritime delimitation and technological exchanges, and agreements designed to establish universal standards for the treatment of civilians in times of war. Australia has been heavily involved in international measures to outlaw the use of weapons of mass destruction. Australia has also been actively engaged in work on aspects of the law of the sea and the international trading system.

Australia’s Currency Heritage

Many forms of currency were used in the Australian colonies after the arrival of the first European settlers in 1788. In the rough early conditions barter was necessary, and payment in commodities like rum sometimes replaced money in transactions. Some of the first official notes used in Australia were Police Fund Notes, issued by the Bank of New South Wales in 1816.

After federation in 1901, when Australia became an independent nation, the federal government became responsible for the currency. The Australian Notes Act was passed in 1910. In 1913 the first series of Australian notes was issued, based on the old British system of 12 pence to a shilling, 20shillings to a pound.

 

1. General Skilled Migrant Program:

a) Skilled Independent Category

b) Skilled Sponsored

c) Skilled Regional Sponsored Visa

2. Business Skills Category:

a) Business Investor Category,

b) Business Owner Category,

c) Business Executive Category

Skilled Workers Visas, Australia

Effective July 1, 2011, new points system has been rolled out the below mentioned Skilled Migration Visas. The Qualifying Score is now 65 points for Skilled Subclasses:

a) Skilled Independent Category Subclass 175

b) Skilled Sponsored Subclass 176

c) Skilled Regional Sponsored Visa Subclass 475

 

Also, effective July 1, 2011, only newly introduced Skilled Occupation Lists Schedule 1 & 2 would be applicable.

Department of Immigration and Citizenship Australia introduces ANZSCO wef 1 July 2010. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) is a system developed to collect, publish and analyze occupation statistics across government agencies and is being introduced by the department as the new standard to capture occupation information in all visa, settlement and citizenship programs. Besides this, the new Changes to the General Skilled Migration Program included the removal of the MODL and New Skilled Occupation List w.e.f July 1, 2010.

General Skilled Migrant Program

New Points Grid for Immigrating as a General Skilled Migrant

 

Factor

Description

Points

Age

18-24

25

25-32

30

33-39

25

40-44

15

45-49

0

English language

Competent English – IELTS 6

0

Proficient English – IELTS 7

10

Superior English – IELTS 8

20

Australian/ Oversea Skilled Employment in nominated occupation undertaken in past 10 years

 

Max points awarded – 20

One Year in Australia

5

Three Years in Australia

10

Five Years in Australia

15

Eight Years in Australia

20

Three Years in Overseas

5

Five Years in Overseas

10

Eight Years in Overseas

15

Qualifications (Australian or recognized Overseas)

Australian Diploma or trade qualification or other qualification recognized body a relevant Assessing Authority.

10

At Least a Bachelor Degree

15

Doctorate

20

Australian Study requirement

Minimum two years full time

5

Study in Regional Area

Must meet the Australian Study requirement while studying in a regional area

5

Professional Year

Completion of recognized Professional Year

5

Credentialed Community Language

NAATI accreditation

5

Partner Skills

Primary Applicants partner meets threshold requirements for skilled migration visa

5

Nomination by state/ territory government (subclass 176 or 886 visa)

Nomination by a state or territory government under a state migration plan

5

Designated area sponsorship or nominated by state / territory government (subclass 475 or 487 visa)

Sponsorship by an eligible relative living in a designated area or nomination by a state or territory government under a state migration plan

10

Australia’s economy remains one of the strongest in the world, offering millions of jobs every week, making it an extremely preferred destination for highly skilled young people. It also exhibits that Australian employers require skilled workforce for achieving their organizational goals.

The eligibility of skilled migrants, who desire to immigrate to Australia, is assessed on a point-based system. In this system, points are awarded after considering the age, work experience, qualifications and language proficiency of the aspirant. Other ways of obtaining immigration visa to Australia under General Skilled Migrant Program includes:

 

a) Skilled Independent Category Subclass 175

b) Skilled Sponsored Subclass 176

c) Skilled Regional Sponsored Visa Subclass 475

To apply for one of the above visas, the applicants need to satisfy the following threshold requirements:

  • Be under 50 years of age at the time of applying for a visa;

  • Meet the threshold English language requirement of competent English;

  • Nominate and hold a skilled assessment for an occupation on the Skilled Occupation List at the time of lodging their application;

  • Provide evidence of recent skilled employment in a skilled occupation or have recently completed the Australian Study requirement.

 

Effective July 1, 2011, the points test has been changed. The points for the various parameters are as follows:

Age:

An applicant is eligible if he/ she is aged between 45 and 49 years, on the day of making their application. However, no points would be awarded for the above mentioned age limit.

 Points

 Age

 25

 18 – 24

 30

 25 – 32

 25

 33 – 39

 15

 40 – 44

 0

 45 – 49

English Level:

To be eligible under the skilled migration points, an applicant should be competent English, which essentially means a minimum score of 6 in each of the four components of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) test or other language test specified by the Minister.

All the applicants who hold a valid passport and are citizens of the United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, the United States of America or the Republic of Ireland are deemed to meet competent English language requirement.

However, points can be scored on levels of Proficient and Superior English.

 

The points test awards points for English language ability are as follows:

Points

 Description of English language ability

 20

 Superior English (a score of at least 8 in each of the four components of the IELTS test, or equivalent standard in a specified test)

 10

 Proficient English (a score of at least 7 in each of the four components of the IELTS test, or equivalent standard in a specified test)

Skilled Employment:

Under the employment in skilled occupation, an applicant will be awarded points for employment either in Australia or overseas. Furthermore, to claim points for skilled employment, the applicant must have experience in nominated occupation or a closely related occupation. However, the applicants can claim points for Australian skilled employment and overseas skilled employment, both under the points test.

For the purpose of awarding points, skilled employment in the nominated occupation or a closely related occupation would comprise at least 20 hours employment per week, as considered by the department. Furthermore, to determine whether an applicant’s skilled employment is closely related to their nominated occupation, the occupations within one unit group classified under Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) would be taken into consideration by the department.

Australian skilled employment in their nominated occupation or a closely related occupation:

Points

 Length of employment

 5

 One year

 10

 Three years

 15

 Five years

 20

 Eight years

Overseas skilled employment in their nominated occupation or a closely related occupation:

Points

 Length of employment

 5

 One year

 10

 Three years

 15

 Five years

Educational Qualification:

Points can only be awarded for the highest qualification attained.

Points

 Description of education qualifications

 20

 Doctorate Degree

 15

 At least a Bachelor Degree

 10

 Australian Diploma or trade qualification.

 10

 Award or qualification recognized by the assessing authority in the assessment of the skilled occupation

In order to claim points, the applicant needs to get the qualification obtained overseas, the recognized as being of a standard comparable to the relevant Australian level qualification. In case an applicant has qualification not related to their nominated occupation, he / she may also be able to claim points for the same.

Partner Skills:

In case a primary applicant’s partner satisfies the threshold criteria for a visa, the applicant can claim five points.

The following is the criteria to claim partner points:

  • Be included on the same visa application as the primary applicant

  • Not be an Australian permanent resident or citizen

  • Be less than 50 years old at the time of application

  • Nominate an occupation on the same SOL as the primary applicant, and be assessed by the relevant assessing authority as having suitable skills for the occupation

  • Have competent English

  • Have been employed in a skilled occupation for at least 12 months in the 24 months before the application is lodged, or completed the Australian Study Requirement.

State or Territory nomination and designated area sponsorship

The following is the criteria to claim partner points:

Points

 Description of sponsorship

 5

 Nomination by a state or territory government under a state migration plan, for the purposes of a subclass 176 application

 10

 Nomination by a state or territory government under a state migration plan, or sponsorship by an eligible relative, to a designated area for the purposes of a subclass 475 Skilled – Regional Sponsored application.

Business Immigration

A great country to live and do business and 3,200 km north in Australia covers 7,682,300 square kilometers, which makes it more than twice as large as India and about the same size as the 48 mainland states of the USA.

It is the world’s sixth largest country, covers 5% of the Earth’s land surface and measures about 4,000 km from east to west to south. Climate is generally arid to semiarid; temperate in south and east; tropical in north.

 

A healthy economic structure

Australia has a comprehensive economic policy framework in place. The economy is globally competitive and remains an attractive destination for investment. Australia has a sound, stable and modern institutional structure that provides certainty to businesses.

 

Migrating to Australia as Business Person

The Business Migration program encourages successful business people to settle permanently in Australia and develop new or existing businesses. On 1 March 2003, a new two-stage Business Migration scheme was introduced for Australia. An overview of the business Skills Category and pathways to permanent residence is given below:

  • State/Territory Sponsored Business Owner (Provisional) category

  • Business Owner (Provisional) category

  • State/Territory Sponsored Senior Executive (Provisional) category

  • Senior Executive (Provisional) category

  • State/Territory Sponsored Investor (Provisional) category

  • Investor (Provisional) category

To be eligible under this category the applicant should:

  • Be sponsored by an appropriate regional authority of a State or Territory government;

  • Have an overall successful business career;

  • Have an ownership interest in a main business or main businesses that had an annual turnover of at least A$ 300,000 for at least 2 of the 4 fiscal years immediately before the application is made or had a sound continuous business employment record in a senior management role on a qualifying business for at least 4 years immediately before the application is made and have demonstrated a high level of management skill.

  • Have net value of business & personal assets (including spousal assets) at least A$ 250,000 and are available for transfer to Australia within 2 years after the grant of visa, plus sufficient assets available to settle in Australia;

  • Be aged less than 55 years at the time of application

Migrating to Australia as Business Owner

To be eligible under this category the applicant should have an overall successful business career

  • Annual turnover of at least A$ 500,000 in the main business or main businesses for at least 2 of the 4 fiscal years immediately before the application for visa is submitted.

  • Net value of business & personal assets (including spousal assets) is at least A$ 500,000 which is available for transfer to Australia within 2 years after the grant of a visa, plus sufficient assets available to settle in Australia.

  • Age less than 45 years at the time of application.

  • Vocational English i.e. scoring 5 bands in IELTS examination.

State / Territory Sponsored Business Owner

To be eligible under this category the applicant should have:

  • Been sponsored by an appropriate regional authority of a State or Territory government.

  • An overall successful business career.

  • Occupied a position in the 3 highest levels of the management structure for at least 2 of the 4 years immediately before the application is made.

  • Net value of business & personal assets (including spousal assets) is at least A$ 250,000, which is available for transferring to Australia within 2 years after the grant of a visa, plus sufficient assets available to settle in Australia.

  • Aged less than 55 years at the time of application.

Senior Executive

To be eligible under this category the applicant should:

  • Have an overall successful business career.

  • Occupied a position in the 3 highest levels of the management structure for at least 2 of the 4 years immediately before the application is made.

  • Net value of business & personal assets (including spousal assets) is at least A$ 500,000 which are available for transfer to Australia within 2 years after the grant of a visa, plus sufficient assets available to settle in Australia.

  • Aged less than 45 years at the time of application.

  • Vocational English test i.e. scoring 5 bands in IELTS examination.

Migrating to Australia as an Investor

To be eligible under this category the applicant should have:

  • An overall successful record of eligible investment or qualifying business activity.

  • At least 3 years experience of direct involvement in managing one or more qualifying businesses or eligible investments.

  • Direct involvement in either managing a qualifying business (owned by an applicant and spouse) and having ownership interest of at least 10% of the total value of the business or maintaining direct involvement in managing eligible investments of A$ 1,500,000 for at least one of the 5 fiscal years immediately before the application is made.

  • Net value of assets (including spousal assets) is at least A$ 2,250,000 for 2 fiscal years immediately before the application is made. 
Aged less than 45 years at the time of application. 
Vocational English i.e. scoring 5 bands in IELTS examination.

State/Territory Sponsored Investor

To be eligible under this category the applicant should:

  • Be sponsored by an appropriate regional authority of a State or Territory government.

  • Have at least 3 years experience of direct involvement in managing one or more qualifying businesses or eligible investments.

  • Direct involvement in either managing a qualifying business (owned by the applicant and spouse) and having ownership interest of at least 10% of the total value of the business or maintaining direct involvement in managing eligible investments of A$750,000 for at least one of the 5 fiscal years immediately before the application is made.

  • Net value of assets (including spousal assets) is at least A$ 1,125,000 for 2 fiscal years immediately before the application is made.

  • Aged less than 55 years at the time of application.